Available phosphorus and sulphur, exchangeable aluminum and remaining phosphorus in rhodic eutrudox submitted to gypsum cultivated with wheat and soybean

Leandro Rampim, Maria do Carmo Lana, Jucenei Fernando Frandoloso

Abstract


The response to gypsum as a supplier of nutrients in the subsurface provides better root distribution for annual crops plants and thus provides use of larger volume of soil increasing the uptake of water and nutrients and therefore increased productivity, especially with evidence of interference of gypsum in phosphorus available in the soil. In this study evaluated the use of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) the levels of available phosphorus and sulfur, exchangeable aluminum and interference in the remaining phosphorus in the soil at 0-0.10, 0.10-0.20; 0.20-0.40 m of deep in Rhodic Eutrudox in no tillage and crop yields of wheat and soybean. We conducted sampling of soil at six and 12 months after surface application of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000 and 5000 kg ha-1 gypsum and treatment without application of gypsum. The use of gypsum increased linearly the S content is available in layers from 0-0,10, 0,10-0,20 and 0,20 to 0,40 m deep, with the minimum content of available P at a dose of 2200 kg ha-1 and exchangeable Al with a dose of 3000 kg ha-1 layers evaluated, however, did not influence the values of remaining P. The use of gypsum increased linearly the S content available at depths of 0-0.10, 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m, minimum P content available at the dose of 3166 kg ha-1 and exchangeable Al minimum point at the dose of 3300 kg ha-1 at a depth of 0.20-0.40 m however, did not affect the remaining P values. The use of gypsum increased the productivity of wheat, but did not influence soybean yield.


Keywords


Glycine max; Triticum aestivum, Sulfate; Maximum adsorption capacity of phosphate; Liming.



DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5433/1679-0359.2013v34n4p1623

Semina: Ciênc. Agrár.
Londrina - PR
E-ISSN 1679-0359
DOI: 10.5433/1679-0359
E-mail: semina.agrarias@uel.br
Este obra está licenciado com uma Licença Creative Commons Atribuição-NãoComercial 4.0 Internacional