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Skin cancer deaths more than DOUBLE in 50 years

por Luis Kitson (2020-09-22)


Deaths from skin cancer have more than doubled in the past fifty years as more and more British sunseekers jet abroad on cheap holidays.

Official figures analysed by Cancer Research UK reveal that people are dying from melanoma skin cancer at 2.5 times the rate they were in the 1970s.

Almost nine in ten cases of the skin cancer are caused by too much sun, and experts warned that the desire to achieve the ‘beauty norm' of looking tanned can prove fatal.

People who get sunburnt just once every two years are around three times as likely to develop melanoma, the charity said.

Deaths from skin cancer have more than doubled in the past fifty years as more and more British sunseekers jet abroad on cheap holidays.

7 years agoPictured: A man and a woman enjoy the sun in Playa del Ingles, Gran Canaria, Spain, on Saturday

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in UK, with 16,200 new cases a year and around 2,300 deaths a year. 

The number of cases has more than doubled since the 1990s and deaths have also surged in recent decades.

In the early 1970s, out of every 100,000 people in the UK 1.5 would die of skin cancer.

But this has now risen to 3.8. 

The rise has been greater among men than women, with male death rates now three times higher than they were in the 1970s.

Official figures analysed by Cancer Research UK reveal that people are dying from melanoma skin cancer at 2.5 times the rate they were in the 1970s.

Pictured: People enjoy the weekend at La Malvarrosa beach in Valencia, Spain, on Saturday

Karis Betts, of Cancer Research UK, said: ‘Compared to where we were a couple of decades ago, people are getting a lot more sun. 

'They are travelling abroad more, and more likely to go on cheap package holidays, sometimes several times a year.

‘The trend for looking tanned has become more common, and there is a beauty norm of having a tan, which needs to be challenged. 

'There is no such thing as healthy tanning, a tan is a sign of damage.

We are trying to encourage people to own their skin tone, and denormalise tanning and sunbed use.'

Almost nine in ten cases of the skin cancer are caused by too much sun, and experts warned that the desire to achieve the ‘beauty norm' of looking tanned can prove fatal.

Pictured: Two tourists enjoy their holidays at the Figueretes beach on August 17, https://www.fontspring.com/search?q=www.nubobeauty.com 2020 in Ibiza, Spain, on Monday

She added that increases in skin cancer rates is also partly due to the ageing population and people living longer. 

Older people are more likely to develop melanoma and to die from it.

Miss Betts said that the higher rates among men is likely to be because they are diagnosed at a later stage, when treatment is less successful. 

‘Men are less likely to get problems checked out and often male bravado means they will avoid going to the doctor,' she said.

People who get sunburnt just once every two years are around three times as likely to develop melanoma.

Pictured: Sunseekers flock to Figueretes beach in Ibiza, Spain, on Monday

Michelle Mitchell, Cancer Research UK's chief executive, said: ‘There are many benefits to going outside, felt now more than ever because of sustained periods of lockdown.

‘But something we should all be aware of is sun safety and how to reduce our risk of melanoma.

‘Even though many summer holidays on beaches abroad have come to a halt, you can still get burnt in the UK sun.

‘With rates rising, it's never been more important to stay safe in the sun and contact your GP if you notice any unusual change to your skin.' 

In the early 1970s, out of every 100,000 people in the UK 1.5 would die of skin cancer.

But this has now risen to 3.8. Pictured: Sunbathers lie down at the Malmousque beach in Marseille, southern France, in July

Cancer Research is urging people to avoid the sun between 11am and 3pm, to wear suncream and to cover up with hats and T-shirts.

Currently, 91 per cent of melanoma patients in England are diagnosed at an early stage, and 91 per cent will survive their disease for five years or more.

The first sign of melanoma is often a new mole or a change in the appearance of an existing mole. 

Other changes to the skin, such as rashes, dimples or redness, can also be a sign.

Melanoma can appear anywhere on your body, but they most commonly appear on the back in men and on the legs in women.